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See also: Hazards

The force that gravity exerts on a creature determines how they develop physically as well as their ability to perform certain actions. In addition, Gravity affects the amount of damage a creature takes from Falling Damage.

Gravity conditions may vary considerably from one environment to the next. However, for ease of play, the Star Wars Roleplaying Game presents four simplified Gravity environments: Normal Gravity (0.8 to 1.2 g), Low Gravity (0.1 to 0.8 g), High Gravity (More than 1.2 g), and Zero-Gravity (Less than 0.1 g). The following sections summarize the game effects for each type of environment.

Normal Gravity Edit

Normal Gravity imposes no special modifiers on a character's Ability Scores, attack rolls, or Skill Checks. Likewise, Normal Gravity does not modify a creature's Speed, Carrying Capacity, or the amount of damage it takes from Falling Damage.

Low Gravity Edit

In a Low Gravity environment, it becomes easier to move and lift heavy objects, as well as perform Strength-related tasks. In addition, creatures take less Falling Damage.

Speed: Your Speed increases by one-quarter (Round down to nearest square, minimum 1). This bonus applies to all modes of movement.

Carrying Capacity: A creature's normal Carrying Capacity is doubled. In addition, all creatures gain a +2 circumstance bonus on any Strength check made to lift or move a heavy unsecured object.

Skill Check Bonuses: All creatures gain a +2 circumstance bonus on all Strength-based Skill Checks (Including Climb, Jump, and Swim checks).

Attack Roll Penalty: All creatures take a -2 penalty on attack rolls while operating in a Low Gravity environment, unless they are native to Low Gravity environments, or have the Spacehound Talent.

Damage From Falling: Roll d4s instead of d6s when calculating Falling Damage.

High Gravity Edit

In a High Gravity environment, the pull of Gravity is significantly greater than normal. Although an object's Mass doesn't change, it becomes effectively heavier. It becomes harder to move and carry heavy objects, as well as perform Strength-related tasks. In addition, you take more damage from Falling Damage. Even the simple task of walking or lifting one's arms feels more laborious.

Speed: Your Speed decreases to three-quarters normal (Round down to nearest square, minimum 1). This penalty applies to all modes of movement.

Carrying Capacity: A creature's normal Carrying Capacity is halved. In addition, all creatures take a -2 penalty on any Strength check made to lift or move a heavy unsecured object.

Skill Check Penalties: All creatures take a -2 penalty on all Strength-based Skill Checks (Including Climb, Jump, and Swim checks).

Attack Roll Penalty: All creatures take a -2 penalty on attack rolls while operating in a High Gravity environment, unless they are native to High Gravity environments, or have the Spacehound Talent.

Damage From Falling: Roll d8s instead of d6s when calculating Falling Damage.

Zero-Gravity Edit

Creatures in a Zero-Gravity environment can move enormously heavy objects. As movement in Zero-Gravity requires only the ability to grab onto, or push away from larger objects, Climb and Jump checks no longer apply.

Most creatures find Zero-Gravity environments disorientating, taking penalties on their attack rolls and suffering the effects of Space Sickness. In addition, creatures in Zero-Gravity are easier to Bull Rush than in other types of Gravity.

Space Sickness: When a living creature is exposed to weightlessness, make an attack roll (1d20 + 0) against it's Fortitude Defense. If the attack succeeds, the character moves -1 Persistent step down the Condition Track. This Persistent Condition cannot be removed without a DC 20 Treat Injury check, or after 8 hours, whichever comes first. This attack recurs after 8 hours, but does not recur again after that. Creatures with the Spacehound Talent and Droids do not suffer the effects of Space Sickness.

Speed: In a Zero-Gravity environment, a creature gains a Fly Speed equal to it's base Land Speed, or it retains it's natural Fly Speed (Whichever is greater). However, movement is limited to straight lines only; a creature can change course only by pushing away from larger objects (Such as bulkheads).

Carrying Capacity: A creature's normal Carrying Capacity increases by 10 times in a Zero-Gravity environment. In addition, all creatures gain a +10 circumstance bonus on any Strength check made to lift or move a heavy unsecured object.

Check Penalties: All creatures take a -5 penalty on attack rolls and Skill Checks while operating in a Zero-Gravity environment, unless they are native to Zero-Gravity environments or have the Spacehound Talent.

Long-Term Exposure: Long-Term Exposure to Zero-Gravity conditions can cause serious problems when returning to Normal Gravity. A creature that spends 120 hours or more in a Zero-Gravity environment moves -2 Persistent steps down the Condition Track upon returning to Normal Gravity. These steps down the Condition Track cannot be removed unless the character spends at least 24 hours in Normal Gravity.

Weight vs. Mass Edit

While an object in Zero-Gravity loses Weight, it does not lose Mass or momentum. Thus, while a character could push a 10-ton piece of Equipment around in space, albeit slowly, setting it to stop is a bit more difficult. If a character were to come between that piece of Equipment and a solid object, that character would be crushed as if they were in Normal Gravity- just more slowly.

For simplicity, assume that a Strength check to lift or move an object in Zero-Gravity gains a +10 circumstance bonus. However, stopping an object already in motion does not receive this same bonus.

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