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See also: Leveling Up 101

Make sure you review the Heroic Classes, Species, Talents, Feats, Abilities, and Skills sections before using this overview when creating a Star Wars character. Print out a copy of the Character Sheet to use as a record of your character.

Characters generally begin play at 1st level and attain additional levels as they complete adventures.

Step 1: Generate Ability Scores. Edit

Every character has six Abilities that represent the character's basic strengths and weaknesses. These Abilities- Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma- affect everything a hero does, from fighting to using Skills.

A score of 10 or 11 in a ability is average. Higher scores grant bonuses, and lower scores give penalties. When you create your character, you'll want to put your higher scores into the Abilities most closely associated with your character's Heroic Class.

Use one of the methods described in the Abilities section to generate your six Ability Scores. Record the scores on a piece of scrap paper and put them aside for the moment.

Step 2: Select Your Species Edit

As a Star Wars character, you aren't limited to simply being Human. There are a variety of Species available, from Mon Calamari to Wookiee. Select the Species (Or Droid) you want to play from those presented in the Species section.

Each Species has its own set of special abilities and modifiers. Record these traits on your Character Sheet.

Step 3: Choose Your Class Edit

A Heroic Class provides you with a strong point for your character, a frame upon which you can hang Skills, Feats, and various story elements. Choose a Heroic Class from those presented in the Heroic Classes section and write in on your Character Sheet.

Step 4: Assign Ability Scores Edit

Now that you know what Species and Heroic Class you want your character to be, take the scores you generated in Step 1 and assign each to one of the six Abilities: Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma. Then make any adjustments to these scores according to the Species you selected.

For guidance, each Heroic Class description indicates which Abilities are most important for that Heroic Class. You might want to put your highest scores in the Abilities that accentuate the natural benefits of the Heroic Class.

Record your Ability Scores on your Character Sheet. Record your Ability Modifiers as well.

Step 5: Determine Combat Statistics Edit

In Character Combat, you need to know your character's Hit Points, Defenses, Damage Threshold, attack bonuses, and Speed, as well as how many Force Points you have to spend.

Hit Points Edit

Each character can withstand a certain amount of damage before falling unconscious or dying. The ability to take damage and keep functioning is represented by the character's Hit Points.

Your Heroic Class determines how many Hit Points you have at 1st level, as shown below:

HEROIC CLASS STARTING HIT POINTS
Noble, Scoundrel, Technician 18 + Constitution modifier
Scout, Force Prodigy 24 + Constitution modifier
Jedi, Soldier 30 + Constitution modifier
For example, if your character belongs to the Scoundrel Class and you have a Constitution score of 12, you start with 19 Hit Points (18 plus 1 for your Constitution bonus).

Your Hit Points increase as you gain levels, as described in the Heroic Classes section.

Defenses Edit

Determine your character's Defenses as follows:

Reflex Defense: 10 + Your Heroic Level or Armor Bonus + Dexterity Modifier + Class Bonus (If any) + Natural Armor Bonus (If any) + Size Modifier

Fortitude Defense: 10 + Your Heroic Level + Constitution Modifier + Class Bonus (If any) + Equipment Bonus (If any)

Will Defense: 10 + Your Heroic Level + Wisdom Modifier + Class Bonus (If any)

When you take your first level in a Heroic Class, you gain Class bonuses on two or more Defenses, as shown in the Heroic Classes section.

If you wear Armor, you must substitute your Armor Bonus for your Heroic Level when calculating your Reflex Defense. For example, a 1st level Soldier with a Dexterity of 12 while wearing a Blast Helmet and Vest (+2 Armor Bonus) has a Reflex Defense of 13 (10 + 2 Armor + 1 Dex + 1 Class). Some types of Armor also provide an Equipment bonus to your Fortitude Defense in addition to an Armor Bonus to your Reflex Defense (As noted in the Equipment section).

Damage Threshold Edit

Attacks that deal massive amounts of damage can impair or incapacitate you regardless of how many Hit Points you have remaining. Your Damage Threshold determines how much damage a single attack must deal to reduce your combat effectiveness or, in some cases, kill you.

A Small or Medium character's Damage Threshold is equal to his or her Fortitude Defense. Record this number on your Character Sheet.

Base Attack Bonus Edit

The character's Base Attack Bonus. Apply this bonus to the character's attack rolls. Base Attack Bonuses do not apply to damage rolls. Your character's Heroic Class determines your Base Attack Bonus. Record this number on your Character Sheet:

HEROIC CLASS 1st LEVEL BASE ATTACK BONUS
Jedi +1
Noble +0
Scoundrel +0
Scout +0
Soldier +1
Technician +0
Force Prodigy +0

Melee Attack Bonus Edit

To determine your Melee Attack Bonus, add your Strength modifier to your Base Attack Bonus. Certain Feats and Talents might provide additional modifiers, so make adjustments as necessary.

Ranged Attack Bonus Edit

To determine your Ranged Attack Bonus, add your Dexterity modifier to your Base Attack Bonus. Certain Feats and Talents might provide additional modifiers, so make adjustments as necessary.

Speed Edit

Your character's Species (Or Locomotion System if Droid) determines their Speed. Most Species have a Speed of 6 squares. Ewoks (Among others) have a Speed of 4 squares because they are Small.

Force Points Edit

Your character begins play with 5 Force Points. Indicate this in the space provided on the Character Sheet.

If you end up taking the Force Boon Feat, you gain an additional 3 Force Points.

Destiny Point Edit

If your GM uses the optional Destiny rules, your character begins play with 1 Destiny Point. Indicate this in the space provided on the Character Sheet.

Step 6: Select Skills Edit

Skills represent how well a character accomplishes dramatic tasks other than combat, such as disabling a tractor beam generator or climbing a sheer surface.

Each Heroic Class comes with a list of Class Skills. From this list, you get to pick a number of Skills in which your character is considered Trained. The number of Trained Skills your character gets depends on the Heroic Class you've selected and your character's Intelligence modifier. Once you've selected your character's Trained Skills, determine the Skill Check modifier for each Skill.

The Skill Check modifier for Trained Skills is one-half your Character Level (Rounded down) + the relevant Ability modifier + 5. If you are Untrained in a Skill, the Skill Check modifier is one-half your Character Level (Rounded down) + the relevant Ability modifier. (In other words, you get a +5 bonus on Skill Checks made using Trained Skills.)

Some Skills cannot be used Untrained. See the Skills section for more information.

Step 7: Select Feats Edit

Feats are special features that provide a character with new capabilities or improvements.

Your character begins play with at least one Feat. If you are playing a Human, you get a bonus Feat. In addition, your Heroic Class also gives you several starting Feats that you get for free.

Select your Feats from the Feats section and record them on the Character Sheet. Some Feats may affect the information you've already recorded, so make adjustments as necessary.

Step 8: Select a Talent Edit

At 1st level, your character gets a Talent (A special class feature). Choose a Talent from any of the Talent Trees available to your Heroic Class. Characters that have the Force Sensitivity Feat may take a Talent from a Force Talent Tree, or take a Talent from their Force Tradition Talent Tree. Some Talents have prerequisites that must be met before they can be selected. Select your Talents from the Talents section and record them on the Character Sheet. Some Talents may affect the information you've already recorded, so make adjustments as necessary.

Step 9: Determine Starting Credits and Buy Gear Edit

Your character's Heroic Class determines how many credits you start play with. Use your credits to purchase Equipment for your character. The Equipment section details Weapons, Armor, and gear you can purchase. Record all purchased Equipment and remaining credits on the Character Sheet.

Step 10: Finish your Character Edit

Main Article: Character Details

The last details you need to add to your Character Sheet help you to visualize and roleplay your character. You need a name, of course- something that fits your Heroic Class, Species, and the Star Wars galaxy. You should also determine your character's age, gender, height, weight, eye and hair color, skin color, and any relevant background information you want to provide. (Make sure to run your ideas past your Gamemaster so that he or she can fit them into the campaign.)

The Heroic Traits section provides guidelines that can help you with these details and characteristics.

Additional Character Concepts Edit

Often times, campaigns and adventures are built around central themes decided on by the Gamemaster. These themes could be era-specific, or revolve around different aspects of galactic life. The following articles detail several character concepts available for a variety of different campaign themes.

The Old Republic Era Edit

Reference Book: Star Wars Saga Edition Knights of the Old Republic Campaign Guide

Main Article: Old Republic Heroes

In an Old Republic Campaign, exciting character and plot development are integral to creating the feel of an era previously established by computer games, comics, and novels. Much as a classic-era campaign strives to re-create the feel of the movies, an Old Republic Campaign should capture the atmosphere of its earlier incarnations. Your campaign will feel more authentic if the Gamemaster and players give their characters rich backstories that develop over the course of the game. This article focuses on new character concepts and development.

The Clone Wars Edit

Reference Book: Star Wars Saga Edition Clone Wars Campaign Guide

Main Article: Heroic Traits

During the Clone Wars, few worlds are untouched by the tide of battle. From these affected worlds rise heroes whose actions shake the foundations of the galaxy. These are your heroes, and your actions can affect how systems, sectors, and even the entire galaxy endures the hardships of the Clone Wars.

The Rebellion Era Edit

Reference Book: Star Wars Saga Edition Rebellion Era Campaign Guide

Main Article: Heroic Traits

For the heroes of The Rebellion Era, fighting against The Galactic Empire means putting their lives- and the lives of their loved ones- on the line, risking everything to oppose a tyrannical government. Heroes in a Rebellion Era Campaign are among the most iconic in all Star Wars lore. Han Solo is the prototypical Scoundrel; Princess Leia is the model for the Noble. They are great heroes not only because they fight against a powerful enemy, but also because they put everything at risk, enduring great triumphs and horrific tragedies to free the galaxy from the oppression of Emperor Palpatine.

The Legacy Era Edit

Reference Book: Star Wars Saga Edition Legacy Era Campaign Guide

Main Article: Legacy Heroes

This section provides players with information on creating Legacy Era heroes. It presents new options for existing Heroic Classes and new Talents and Feats specific to this era. This campaign guide assumes that the heroes are fighting for the cause of good against the tyranny of The Galactic Empire. The player characters might be agents of The Galactic Alliance, Jedi struggling to rebuild The Jedi Order, mercenaries living in The Fringe, or even agents of the Empire loyal to deposed Emperor Roan Fel. One or more of them might be Imperial Knights- neither Jedi nor Sith, but trained Force-users nonetheless.

Fringe Heroes Edit

Reference Book: Star Wars Saga Edition Scum and Villainy

Main Article: Fringe Heroes

Outside the legitimate authority of the galaxy, life is dangerous. Laws are made and enforced by the powerful with little interest in justice or fairness. On the fringes, crime lords and gangsters command through a generous use of force and terror to ensure that the lesser cow to their every whim. With no Empire or Republic, rule goes to the individual who can take power and hold it longest. Amid these lawless places rogue heroes thrive, carving names for themselves in a dangerous, though exhilarating universe, fighting syndicates, slavers, pirates, and other villains. This section explores how heroes who skirt the line between light and dark develop talents and abilities that set them apart from their more mainstream counterparts.

Military Heroes Edit

Reference Book: Star Wars Saga Edition Galaxy at War

Main Article: Military Heroes

Life on the battlefield can be intense, terrifying, exhilarating, or short. It can even be all of these at once. Most galactic citizens take food, shelter, and safety for granted, but in combat- from simple skirmishes between rival forces to galaxy-shaking conflicts such as The Mandalorian Wars, the Clone Wars, or the Galactic Civil War- those features become luxuries. Those who learn to adapt to harsh and unforgiving conditions survive to fight another day.

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